3031

Listed Buildings in Findon

Building  Details Grade

The Old Well House 

Horsham Road          

Early C19 L-shaped cottage built to imitate a timber-framed cottage  and faced with stucco painted black and white. Two storeys. Three windows.  Tiled roof. Casement windows. One large and one small gable with scalloped  bargeboards. Porch in angle of the L.

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North End House

Horsham Road

Early C19. Two storeys. Three windows. Stuccoed. Slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with flat hood over.

II
     

Ivy Cottage

Horsham Road

L-shaped C18 house. Two storeys. Five windows. Faced with rough plaster. Wooden eaves bracket cornice. South wing has a slate roof, the east wing a tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Porch with eaves bracket cornice and tent-shaped canopy surmounted by a ball finial.

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The Old Village House Hotel

The Square

C18 front to a probably older building. Two storeys. Three windows. Stuccoed and some imitation timbering. Steeply-pitched hipped tiled roof. Some glazing bars intact. Modern porch. Included for group value.

II
     

Peckham’s Butchers

The Square

Butchers shop, formerly house. C16 or earlier timber-framed building, refronted in flint and brick in C18 with butchers shop built out at the front in the C19. Left side has section of exposed timber-frame behind later brick and flint walling. Steeply-pitched tiled roof with gablet. Narrower parallel range to rear of C18 date. Butchers shop of brick painted with hipped tiled roof and penticed tiled shopfront with grille. Interior of shop is tiled with one course of Greek key design.

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Rose Cottage

The Square

C18. Two storeys. Three windows. Faced with flints, whitewashed, with red brick stringcourse and long and short quoins and window surrounds. Tiled roof. Vertical glazing bars intact. (No 2 Rose Cottage was originally a later addition to the same building, but is now a separate dwelling and not listable.)

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The Gun Inn

The Square

Public house, formerly house. North wing is a pre-1530 building with 3-bay crosswing, the former open hall and service end having been engulfed in a later building to the south with late C18 door case and the whole building refurbished in the early C20. The north wing is a possible late C15 crosswing, timber-framed but clad in roughcast with down braces exposed to right side gable and tiled roof with later brick chimney stacks to the north. EXTERIOR: 2 storeys with irregular early C20 fenestration. South wing is also covered in roughcast with hipped tiled roof. 2 storeys with 2 irregularly-placed windows, double or triple sashes, one of Venetian type which appear early C20 and genuine late C18 door case with open pediment, engaged columns semi-circular fanlight and door of 6 fielded panels. Plaster plaque of a gun on the east wall. The 2 wings are joined by a linking portion.5 windows facing east. INTERIOR: north wing retains crown post roof, high arched braces to the first floor indicating a 2-floored upper chamber and dais beam visible in the bar. South wing has dogleg staircase with turned balusters and square newel post, dado panelling and wooden fireplace of Georgian style. (See 1996 Report by Dr Annabelle Hughes.)

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Findon Farmhouse

The Square

Early C19 house built in two sections. Two storeys. Five windows. Faced with roughcast. Stringcourse. Eaves cornice. Slate roof. Sash windows of 20 panes each with glazing bars. One bull's eye window over the doorway. Doorway with fluted pilasters, pediment, semi-circular fanlight and door of six moulded panels. The north section of two windows is a later but still early-mid C19 addition of higher elevation.

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Greypoint House

The Square

Now flats. C19. Two storeys and attic. Three windows. Three dormers. Painted brick. Dentilled eaves cornice. Slate roof. Porch with Corinthian columns containing a round-headed doorway with semi-circular fanlight. Curved bay of two storeys to the right of this. Canted bay of two storeys to the left, the ground floor altered in the C19. One stuccoed window-bay added to east in the early C19.

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Kenseys

Cross Lane

C18. Two storeys. Three windows. Faced with flints with brick dressings and quoins, all painted. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. C19 gabled porch.

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The Malt House

Cross Lane

C18. Two storeys. Four windows. Faced with flints with red brick dressings, quoins and modillion eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Casement windows. Modern glazed porch.

II
     

Coachmans

Nepcote Lane

C18. Two storeys. Two windows. Red brick and grey headers alternately. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway with modern hood and original door of six fielded panels. Lean-to portion to the north, faced in flints, with modern garage doors and a large lunette window above.

II
     

The Wattle House

Nepcote Green

Wattle storage house. Built between 1792 and 1803, probably by George Holford who got permission from the lord of Findon Manor in 1790 to hold an annual sheep fair at Nepcote Green. This building was designed to store the wattles. Built of flint with red brick dressings. Slate roof with 4 brick stacks. Two to three storeys; 3 windows. Cambered window openings, boarded at time of survey. Horseshoe-arched entrances to ground floor with double doors. A unique survival in a national context, one of a very small number of buildings which manifest the importance of sheep to the economy of the southern downlands. Hurdles for fairs were normally stored in the open, such as at Priddy in Somerset where they have become a permanent fixture in the centre of the green. [See VCH Sussex p204, Sussex County Magazine, 1927.]

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Greenside Cottage

Nepcote Lane

Early C19. Two storeys. Four windows. Faced with flints with dressings and quoins of red brick and grey headers. Tiled roof. Glazing bars missing.

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Cissbury 

Nepcote Lane

The centre portion of the east front is an C18 farmhouse. Two storeys. Five windows. Faced with knapped flints with red brick dressings and stringcourse. Wooden modillion eaves cornice. Tiled roof. Glazing bars intact on first floor only. At each end gabled wing containing an attic window and with a large projecting bay of three windows on ground and first floors. C19 additions to the west.

II
     

Threshers

Nepcote Lane

One building. C18. Two storeys. Four windows. Faced with flints once painted, with red brick dressings, quoins and stringcourse. Tiled roof. Casement windows. The plan consists of a centre portion and two projecting wings, one of which is an outhouse.

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Holmbush House

High Street

Early C19. Two storeys. Three windows. Grey headers with white brick dressings, quoins and stringcourse. Slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway in moulded architrave surround with pediment over on console brackets, enriched frieze and door of six fielded panels.

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Averys

High Street

Two parallel wings. Front wing C18. Two storeys and attic. Three windows. Two dormers. Faced with flints with red brick dressings, quoins and eaves cornice of cogging. Stringcourse of red brick and grey headers. Tiled roof. Ordinary sash windows on ground floor with glazing bars intact. Horizontally sliding sash windows above.

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East Lodge

High Street

Originally the Lodge of Findon Place but was separated from it by the main London-Worthing Road. Early C19. Mid C19. Cross-plan. Two storeys. Two windows. Faced with flints with window surrounds and quoins of Roman cement. Tiled roof. Gable to each wing. Casement windows of two lights on first floor and four lights below with dripstones over. One small bay of three lights on ground floor. Gabled porch (now converted into a bay window) with scalloped bargeboards, to the north wing. Chimney breast on south wall.

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The Village Well House in front of Grey Walls

High Street

C19. Four timber uprights support a hipped tiled roof. Iron wheel within this to raise the water from the well.

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Grey Walls

High Street

Early C19. Two storeys. Three windows. Faced with flints with red brick dressings and quoins. Eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof. Bull's-eye window in centre of first floor. Glazing bars missing. Gabled porch containing the original moulded door.

II
     

Holmcroft

High Street

Early C19. Two parallel wings. Two storeys. Three windows. Faced with brown roughcast. Stringcourse. Wide eaves cornice. Hipped slate roof. Glazing bars intact. Doorway to the west with fluted pilasters, pediment on console brackets.

II
     

Findon Manor Hotel

High Street

Originally the Rectory. The centre portion is C18, altered at a later date. Two storeys and attic. Four windows. Three gable dormers. Faced with flints with red brick dressings. Horsham slab roof. One bull's-eye window. The other windows casements. At each end is a matching C19 gabled addition of higher elevation with two windows each and an attic window in the gable. These additions have sash windows with glazing bars. Further gabled addition of two windows to the west, of 1900 circa.

II
     

Findon Place

Findon Road

Mid C18 mansion built by John Cheale, Norroy King at Arms. Two storeys. Five windows. White brick. Stringcourse, cornice and parapet. Hipped slate roof. Windows with Venetian shutters and glazing bars intact.The three centre window-bays project slightly with a pediment over. Round-headed window in centre of first floor, of which the head breaks the line of the cornice. Cartouche above this in the tympanum of the pediment. Stuccoed porch with twin pilaster and projecting cornice. Doorway with rectangular fanlight and double doors of six fielded panels. Contemporary recessed wing to west with one large round-headed window on ground floor and two bulls-eye windows above. Wing of three storeys added to the south east in the early C19 by Mary widow of William Richardson.

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The Parish Church of St John the Baptist

Chancel, north chapel, south transept, twin naves under one roof, north porch and west tower with broached shingled spire. Built of flints. the nave arcade is Transitional Norman, the walls of the nave and the remainder of the church C13, but the roof of the nave was rebuilt as a single span with crown-posts, probably in the C15. The whole building was restored by Sir Gilbert Scott in 1867 but is still a medieval building of considerable character and charm. It is also rather large for a downland village. C13 screen between the north chancel and nave.

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